Following are other opportunities related to ventilation to earn points under Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance (O&M):

  • An indoor-air-quality- (IAQ-) management program qualifies for a point under Indoor Environmental Quality (EQ) Credit 1.1, IAQ Best Management Practices: IAQ Management Program. Many building owners mandate water-leak-detection systems for all equipment installed above ceilings. Some require leak detection for all equipment containing water coils or generating condensate, no matter where it is located. Water leaks into structural materials provide an opportunity for microbial growth. Owners should require leak-detection devices and consider automatic shutoff valves for all water coils and high-water detectors for condensate pans. Owners also should provide capacity in the base-building building-management system to connect devices and provide monitoring of alarms 24/7. Tenants always should install leak detection with tenant improvements.

  • The best way to save energy dollars and earn LEED points in the ventilation arena is to maintain ventilation-air systems properly. Develop a plan that calls for inspecting and cleaning air intakes, fans, and filters. Clogged filters and air intakes cause fans to work harder, while dirt and grit deposits cause fan blades to be less efficient, increasing electricity costs. Clean equipment is quiet as well as economical.

  • If a building owner installs more-efficient filters and reduces the amount of dust introduced to spaces by the base-building ventilation system, tenants can follow with local filters in fan-coil and air-conditioning units. If the facility is equipped with low-efficiency filters, the janitorial staff will be dusting too frequently. Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) 13 filters take up no more space than the filters they replace and earn a point under EQ Credit 1.4, IAQ Best Management Practices: Reduce Particulates in Air Distribution.